BUILDINGS OF PARTICULAR INTEREST

Bolton Town Hall & Civic Centre

Victoria Square, Bolton, BL1 1RU, Grade 1 listed.

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Town Hall


War Memorial


It was in 1866 that work began on the construction of Bolton Town Hall which was officially opened in 1873 by the Prince of Wales. It was not until the years between the two World Wars that the semi-circular Civic Centre was built around the back of what was by then an extended Town Hall. The road between the two buildings is paved with granite setts which together with the imposing buildings makes it a regular setting for film and television company recordings.

Inside the main entrance of the Town Hall is The Hall of Remembrance which houses the illuminated vellum Roll Of Honour of the Fallen. It records the names, both military and civilian, of those who perished in the two World Wars and as a consequence the War Memorial opposite the Town Hall has no names inscribed upon it.The seven towns which were combined with Bolton in 1974 to make up the Bolton Metropolitan area have their own arrangements for honouring the Fallen.

At the front of the Town Hall are statues of Sir Benjamin A. Dobson and Dr. Samuel T. Chadwick.


Bolton Parish Church, St. Peter's, Bolton-le-Moors

Churchgate, Bolton, BL1 1PS

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Bolton Parish Church Old Parish Church


The current building is a Victorian replacement of a 15th century structure. It was consecrated on the 29th June 1871. The cost, £45,000, was met by Peter Ormrod, a local cotton manufacturer and banker.

For A Short History of St Peter's Church, Bolton-le-Moors Click Here

For a list of Vicars of Bolton-le-Moors Click Here



St. Mary the Virgin, Deane, [aka Deane Church]

Junction Road, Bolton, BL3 4LT

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Deane Church


St. Mary the Virgin's Church [aka Deane Church] has Anglo-Saxon roots with parts of the existing building dating from 1452. In the churchyard there are marked gravestones from the 1620's and a memorial stone for the Deane born martyr, George Marsh.


Ss Peter & Paul Roman Catholic Church

Pilkington Street, Bolton, BL3 6HP

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Ss Peter & Paul R.C. Church Ss Peter & Paul R.C. Church


Founded in 1794 this was Bolton's oldest Catholic Church, though the present building date from 1897. The church is now closed.


Little Bolton Town Hall

St. Georges Street, Bolton, BL1 2ER, Grade II listed.

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Little Bolton Town Hall


Opened in 1828 to serve the separate township of Little Bolton the building was subject to a seige during a Chartist riot. Upon conviction some of the rioters were sentenced to transportation.


Bolton School

Chorley New Road / Gilnow Road, Bolton, BL1 4PA

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Bolton School


With roots that go back to 1516 Bolton School was established on this site c 1900 and the present buildings were started in 1915. It is now an Independent Day School with an illustrious list of alumni.


Hall i'th' Wood

Hall i'th' Wood Lane / Green Way, Bolton, BL1 8UA, Grade 1 listed

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Hall i'th' Wood


Originally built as a half timbered hall in the 16th Century it is a rare example of a Tudor wooden framed house. Its principal claim to fame is that it was here that Samuel Crompton invented the Spinning Mule which made such an impact on the cotton industry and sped the industrialisation of the industry. In 1899 local man, William Hesketh Lever, the 1st Lord Leverhulme, bought and restored the house before giving it to the town.


Rivington Great House Barn

Rivington Lane, Rivington, BL6 7SB, Grade 2 listed


Rivington Barn


Built in the 16th Century as a Tithe Barn it is believed to be one of the oldest of its type in the country. In the early 20th Century it was restored by local man, William Hesketh Lever, the 1st Lord Leverhulme.



Smithills Hall

Smithills Dean Road, Bolton, BL1 7NP, Grade 1 listed,

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Smithills Hall


The written records for houses on this site begin in 1335 with the Hulton family who were followed by the Radcliffe's, the Barton's, the Belasyse family and finally the Ainsworth family who sold the house to the council in 1938. The Ainsworth's were successful Bolton bleachers who carried out major rebuilding and modernisation of the building. On the floor at the entrance to the Withdrawing Room is a mark in the flag stone which is said to be the footprint of George Marsh, a victim of religious persecution in the time of Queen Mary.


Turton Tower

Chapeltown Road, Turton, BL7 0HG, Grade 1 listed

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Turton Tower


Built about 1420 as a Peel Tower it was developed into a house by the Orrell family before the house passed to Humphrey Chetham in 1628. Later occupiers or owners were the Greene family, the Frere family and the Horrocks's. The Kay family transformed the house in the mid 1800's into what we see today. The tower was given to Turton Council in 1929.


Ye Olde Man & Scythe

Churchgate, Bolton, BL1 1HL, Grade 2 listed


Man and Scythe


A public house first recorded in 1251, rebuilt in 1636 and now with an early 20th century facia. During the English Civil War it was here that James, Earl of Derby, spent his last night prior to his execution in 1651.